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Got Adhesive Residue

October 6th, 2011

(From DIY network)

Stickers, labels and tapes with pressure-sensitive adhesive (those that are peeled from a backing or roll, then pressed in place) can often times be peeled off. The remaining adhesive can then be rubbed off with your fingers similar to the way you "thumb-roll" rubber cement into small balls. If the adhesive is old or has been exposed to high temperatures and/or humidity, the "thumb- roll" method does not always work. Try removing as much of the label or tape as possible with your fingernail or the dull edge of a knife.

The next procedure will depend on the surface of the household item. It is important to pretest some of the materials. Whatever method you use, first test the cleaning removal material in an inconspicuous part of the surface the label is stuck on the be sure it will not damage that surface. Sometimes the adhesive can be removed with a solution of warm water, liquid dish washing detergent, and vinegar or ammonia.

Washable Surfaces: Cover label with a cloth or sponge saturated with warm vinegar and let stand. When the label is saturated, it should peel off without scraping or causing damage. Rinse. (Note: Use this method only on washable surfaces and washable paint.)

Bathtubs: To remove non slip appliques and strips from bathtubs, saturate a cloth or sponge and squeeze hot vinegar over decals. Vinegar also removes stick-on hooks from painted walls. Saturate a cloth or sponge with vinegar and squeeze the liquid behind the hook so that the vinegar comes in contact with the adhesive. In addition, vinegar can be used to remove price labels and other decals from glass, wood, and china. Paint the label or decal with several coats of white vinegar. Give the vinegar time to soak in and after several minutes the decal can be rubbed off

Another method is to use a hand cleaner like DL, Fast Orange, GoJo, or Goop, usually in an auto dept. Spread them on, and anything that doesn't come off can be easily scraped with a flat wood or hard plastic scraper.

Glass or Metal other than Aluminum: Whatever method you use, first test the cleaning removal material in an inconspicuous part of the surface the label is stuck on the be sure it will not damage that surface.

Fold a paper towel or cloth to make a thick pad, as large as the label. Dampen pad with household ammonia; lay pad over label. (Use masking tape to hold pad onto a vertical surface.) Wait 1/2 to 2 hours. Re-dampen the pad if it tends to dry out. Label will slide off. (NEVER USE AMMONIA ON PLASTIC OR ALUMINUM.)

Another method is to use a hand cleaner like DL, Fast Orange, GoJo, or Goop, usually in an auto dept. Spread them on, and anything that doesn't come off can be easily scraped with a flat wood or hard plastic scraper.

Plastic: If the label on the plastic has been wet, or the article has been stored where it was hot or humid, it will be more difficult to remove. Dampen a small piece of cloth, or the end of a swab stick (cotton twisted on the end of a wooden match or orange stick). Dip cotton end in dry cleaning fluid. Allow the fluid to remain on the label only long enough to allow the label to be rubbed off. Wipe away excess fluid immediately, and wash article in sudsy water and dry. (DO NOT ALLOW FLUID TO REMAIN ON THE PLASTIC SURFACE VERY LONG, AS IT WILL DULL THE FINISH OF THE PLASTIC.)

Decals: First test the cleaning removal material in an inconspicuous part of the surface the label is stuck on the be sure it will not damage that surface. In a small pan, warm a small amount of vinegar. Fold a pad of cloth large enough to cover the decal. Soak the fabric in the hot vinegar and apply to the decal. Hold in place for a couple of minutes, or fasten soaked pad on vertical surface with masking tape. When thoroughly saturated, the decal will peel off with no damage to paint, and no scraping will be necessary.

Other methods require good ventilation - open doors, windows and turn off pilot light Soak a rag in Naptha, or cigarette lighter fluid. Wiped on the surface this may break the glue bond. If it does not try Denatured Alcohol - wiped over surface with cloth, works on some adhesives that naptha misses.

A commercial product - Goof Off also does the trick, although it is flammable, dangerous, dissolves latex paint and plastics etc.



From doityourself.com

Please note that MR Label Co. does not sponsor any of these products, but merely helpful tips.